Time for reparations

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I’m no fan of Julius Malema but I have to accept that he has exposed the failure of the SA government to address the legacy of apartheid and is exploiting that failure to his own benefit. The uncharitable among you may attribute government’s failure to infighting and squabbling over the spoils of victory. And while there certainly does seem to be an element of that, I refuse to believe that this entire government is corrupt. There are too many people in the public sector – right up to ministerial level in some cases – who are quietly getting on with the job in difficult circumstances.

However, the fact remains that this government hasn’t done enough for the victims of apartheid. On that I agree with Malema but we differ markedly on the solution – but then my motivation isn’t self-enrichment. I’m not certain the same can be said for him. But I digress. The real point of this post is to highlight what I think is a brilliant solution to the reparations problem facing this government. I should note at this juncture that this post is an expansion of my editor’s note in the next issue of African Leader magazine, which role is one of my day jobs. More

The road to Zim?

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I have frequently commented that elements of the ANC are sounding more and more like ZANU PF and if one looks at what has happened in the police services in the last few years, that worry is increasingly relevant. Consider this: In my last post concerning the Ficksburg man who was beaten to death by police, I noted that  I had :

…heard a little rumour, that has yet to be confirmed, that the victim fancied himself as a prospective councillor. If that is true, I’d like to know if he was (a) one of those removed from the ANC party list; (b) an independent; or (c) a candidate for an opposition party. The answers could be very revealing.

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Changing the freedom charter?

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With the current furore around the ANC’s determination to stop the media from reporting on its many failures in government, something rather strange happened the other day. I read an article (which I can’t find right now) in which the author argued that the establishment of a media appeals tribunal is contrary to South Africa’s freedom charter. Out of curiosity, I decided to check the ANC’s web site for that revered document to see if the author was right. He (or she) was; Here’s the relevant passage:

The law shall guarantee to all their right to speak, to organise, to meet together, to publish, to preach, to worship and to educate their children;

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